Category Archives: PORTUGAL

Huge underwater pyramid discovered near Portugal

Researchers claim it is an ancient pyramid – an underwater anomaly near the coast of Portugal.

An exciting discovery was revealed by Portuguese News channels. The islands of São Miguel and Terceira in the Azores are supposed to have an enormous underwater pyramid.

Diocleciano Silva first found the “pyramid.” The pyramid, he believes, is a completely square structure, designed to match the directions of the primary compass.

GPS technology produced the measurements. The structure is estimated to be 60 meters high with an 8,000 square meter foundation.

This data was also analyzed by the Portuguese Navy Hydrographic Institute, they wanted to determine if the structure is man-made, or just a natural occurrence.

There are many speculations and theories about the pyramid. Some researchers go to the extremes and claim that this is a remnant of Atlantis, some even say that it was made by aliens.

Scientists say that, based on the newest scans, the structure looks like an underwater volcanic hill.

The pyramid is located in an area of the mid-Atlantic that has been submerged for the last 20,000 years. This is approximately the time of the last ice age.

Supporters of the idea that this is a man-made object are saying that the civilization that existed here before the ice age is responsible for constructing it.

It is interesting that this discovery comes recently after archeologists from the Portuguese Association of Archaeological Research, discovered some evidence of human existence in the Azores thousands of years before the coming of the Portuguese people.

This fact convinced some researchers to further support the idea that a different, older, civilization made the pyramid.

The island of Pico, where evidence for an older civilization than the Portuguese is found. In the background, you can see Mount Pico, the highest mountain in Portugal.

But, however things may look, there is still no definite explanation about the origin of the structure.

Experts from the Portuguese Navy said that Diocleciano used sonar equipment with a very low resolution that made this ordinary volcanic hill look like a perfectly square pyramid.

From a geological perspective, the Azores are located above an active triple junction between three of the world’s large tectonic plates (the North American Plate, the Eurasian Plate, and the African Plate) a condition that has caused the existence of many faults and fractures in this region of the Atlantic.

The islands of the archipelago were formed through a volcanic and seismic activity during the Neogene Period.

When you look at the highly active volcanic and seismic history of the region, it is highly possible that the pyramid was created by these natural forces.

However, there is always space for wilder theories. There is always a small chance that an advanced and intelligent civilization found some high energy potential at this spot of the world and decided to build the pyramid in order to harness that energy.

Energy channeling has always been connected with pyramids and this one is no exception. Furthermore, some ancient pyramid researchers believe that there are two more pyramids located in the vicinity of this one. They suggest that when you look at them, there is a pattern similar to the pyramids in Egypt.

Burials of Africans slaves found at the old rubbish dump in Portugal

Burials of Africans slaves found at the old rubbish dump in Portugal

Adult female skeleton found at Valle da Gafaria, Portugal, suggests a careless burial.
Adult female skeleton found at Valle da Gafaria, Portugal, suggests a careless burial.

Portuguese explorers such as Henry the Navigator started sailing to Africa in the early 15th century, bringing both goods and enslaved people back.

A new archeological study of more than 150 skeletons dumped in Lagos, Portugal, reveals that there were no proper burials given to many of the enslaved Africans and that several of them may even have been tied to death.

The skeletons come from the site of Valle da Gafaria, which was located outside the Medieval walls of the port city of Lagos along the southwest coast of Portugal. Used between the Fifteenth and Seventeenth centuries as a dumping ground, the site also offered up remains of imported ceramics, butchered animal bones, and a few African style ornaments.

When the human skeletons were first analyzed, their shape and unique dental style suggested that they might have been of African origin, and subsequently, genetic analysis confirmed ancestry with Bantu – speaking populations of South Africa. Due to the archaeological and historical information, it is likely that all of these people were enslaved.

In a new research article published in the International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, Maria Teresa Ferreira, Catarina Coelho, and Sofia Wasterlain of the University of Coimbra dug further into the bone data in order to understand how the 158 enslaved Africans came to be buried in a trash pit in Lagos.

Specifically, they investigated the position of each burial, whether or not the burial was made with care, and whether they could identify any evidence that the person’s body had been bound.

Adult female from Valle da Gafaria whose positioning suggests she may have been tied up for burial.
Adult female from Valle da Gafaria whose positioning suggests she may have been tied up for burial.

The Medieval Catholic concern with burial meant that the church was important in handling deaths in Portugal. A body would be ferried to the church in a funeral procession, and a grave would be chosen as close to a religious building as possible.

Elites and nobles were usually buried in an area protected by walls, while more marginal people were located outside. Those people who were further stigmatized by disease, condemned, or otherwise considered not to be deserving of care would be placed far outside sacred spaces.

Enslaved occupants of Medieval Portugal would not necessarily have been prevented from a proper burial. Many were baptized on arrival to Portugal and therefore had a right to a Christian funeral if the slave owner decided to do so.

However, due to the poor conditions aboard the ships, many people arrived so weakened that they died without being baptized. “In such cases,” Ferreira and colleagues explain, “as their humanity was not recognized, the corpses were treated as animal remains: summarily buried in any free field or dumped in the garbage.”

More than half of the people “seemed to have been buried without care,” Ferreira and colleagues note. “Moreover, six individuals showed evidence of having been tied when inhumed.” This suggests that several people had been tied up has intrigued other scholars, although it is unclear from the published research whether the bound limbs were related to the people’s enslaved status or to a more functional method of disposing of bodies.

Biological anthropologist Tim Thompson at Teesside University praised the “sound research” but also told me that “it is difficult to truly assess the examples of tied individuals because there are so few, and no figures are presented.” He suggests that comparing “the anatomical positioning with examples from modern mass graves would allow for deeper analysis. There are many examples of binding and blindfolding in these modern mass violence settings, along with disrespectful deposition of bodies.”

Ellen Chapman, a bioarchaeologist and cultural resources specialist at Cultural Heritage Partners, also told me that she looks forward to further work on this site and this collection of skeletons because “this site is an incredibly disturbing one, and one that clearly illustrates the pervasive mistreatment of enslaved people by the architects of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.”

In particular, Chapman notes that “this skeletal collection is indicative of the high mortality associated with slave ships and the Middle Passage.” Thompson adds that “this work has the potential to contribute to our understanding of both ancient and modern forced slavery contexts.”

In the end, Ferreira and colleagues conclude that “Valle da Gafaria’s osteological collection is extremely important for slavery studies. Not only are there few cemeteries of enslaved people in the world, but also, Lagos is the oldest sample to be discovered and studied in the world.”

Source: archaeologynewsnetwork